Rethinking The Solution

Underage Drinking: Rethinking the Solution (Rough Draft)

     Throughout history, alcohol consumption has played a major role in society and with it a myriad of negative side effects; underage drinking has been a recurring issue throughout the centuries. As the issue continues to worsen, parents and teachers alike try to ameliorate the predicament by educating the youth to the horrors of drinking alcohol, more specifically teens drinking. However, this method of trying to educate teenagers by simply showing the end result of underage drinking is not nearly enough to dissuade teenagers to imbibe the toxin. Thus, people have tried new methods to prevent underage drinking; unfortunately, it would appear the end result seems the same as a plethora of teens still choose to drink. As a result, one may draw the conclusion that these methods are ineffective. A new method needs to be developed in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations.  

     Many are already aware of the growing problem, and in fact, several are also victims or know someone who was involved with an accident or death caused by underage drinking. There has been some decline in fatalities in reference to underage drunk driving; however, it is still one of the major concerns of both parents and teachers. Often, adults feel that by simply showing the end result of such things will resolve the matter. Speaking from experience, health teachers often show videos of stories of underage drinking with the result often either being some kind of serious accident or death. However, even with these explicit warnings, people have continued to drink before the appropriate age on countless occasions. Often, kids brush it off with the “that will never happen to me” mentality.

     There are many reasons for people to not try alcohol and there are also many questions teens have that lead them to be curious about alcohol. Nearly 83% of teens who say they don’t want to try drinking till they’re twenty-one say their parents played a crucial role (http://www.centurycouncil.org/underage-drinking/statistics,10/26/13). Parents play a crucial part in children’s lives even past high school and into college. Thus, it is important that parents and other parent figures stress the importance of staying away from alcohol. Teachers, who are also major role models in teens’ life also play a role in children’s lives. Teens feel that a good teacher is someone that they can turn to for help in any situation, including the pressures of underage drinking. However, their true influence is not always enough to dissuade underage drinking. Underage drinking is still a major issue plaguing our society due to the that fact that kids are more curious than worried when it comes to the matter.

     Humans are curious by nature, and when people are told they can’t have something, they try and get it- reverse psychology in a sense. Same thing applies to underage drinking. Kids are often curious as to the exact effects of alcohol and a mere description is not enough to quench this. In addition, teens are peer pressured into drinking by other teens who have had alcohol before. This is a common occurrence all throughout high school, some parts of middle school, and all the way up into college.

     The statistics around this situation show that there is a decrease in the amount of alcohol consumption in teens. However, a recent survey has shown that over the period of approximately a month, roughly 40% of all twelfth graders have had some form of alcohol and nearly 30% of all twelfth graders have been “drunk”; this percentage of people who have had alcohol jumps by almost 20-30% for people in college (   http://www.centurycouncil.org/underage-drinking/statistics, 10/26/13) This number is striking for many and often people would like to see this number be a lot smaller.

     There are many ways to go about finding a solution to the matter. One idea that has been delved into is lowering the age for drinking. Several countries, mainly throughout Europe, have a drinking age below the age of 21. For example, and in Germany, minors are allowed to consume alcohol if they are with a parent or adult. In addition, the legal drinking age in Puerto Rico 16. This leads many to wonder if introducing such an item at a younger age will encourage teens to be more patient or perhaps allow them to experience it for themselves and determine the risks involved with consumption. However, this does have its own share have negatives. With this plan implemented, the risk for your diagnosis of alcoholism/ being alcoholic greatly increases. With that being said, this will allow people to sooner diagnose such issue and be treated sooner. But then again, what doesn’t have its own risks involved?

     Many different countries, including the United States, permit other dangerous activities for people who are younger than the age of twenty one. For example, one of the biggest things is the purchase and use of cigarettes is permitted in the United States at the age of eighteen. Both alcohol and nicotine are two very dangerous substances, but by comparison, nicotine is far worse. Not only is it much more readily available and easier to purchase, it also has far worse side effects, both on people and the environment. Packaging for cigarettes even states that the product could “cause lung cancer.” In addition, things such as joining the army or being able to vote aren’t prohibited at the same age as drinking alcohol. If people are allowed to be politically active at the age of eighteen, why shouldn’t people be allowed to drink? As both times and people change, it is important to consider what role people should be allowed to participate in important things, whether they be political or recreational.

     There are many ways to dissuade teens from being involved with underage drinking; however, the current methods being implemented haven’t quite been satisfactory. Thus, it has become a priority to develop a new way for people to stay away from underage drinking or finding a way to cope with the matter by lowering the drinking age. Although the percentage of reported of underage drinking has gone down, it can be even lower. It’s time to rethink the solution. 

Underage Drinking: Rethinking the Solution (Rough Draft)

Throughout history, alcoholism has played a major role in any society and it’s brought its own myriad of negative side effects; especially, underage drinking has been a recurring issue throughout the centuries. As the issue continues to exacerbate throughout the times, parents and teachers alike try to ameliorate the predicament by educating the youth to the horrors of both drinking and underage drinking alike. However, this method of trying to educate people by simply showing the end result is not nearly enough to dissuade teenagers to imbibe the toxin. Thus, people have tried new methods to prevent underage drinking; unfortunately the end result seems the same, a plethora of teens going out and drinking. As a result, one may draw the conclusion that these methods of to convince people that alcohol should be consumed at the appropriate age are ineffective. A new method needs to be developed in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations.  

Many are already aware of the growing problem, and in fact, many are also victims or know someone who was involved with an accident or death caused by underage drinking. It is one of the major concerns of parents and teachers alike. Often, most adults feel that by simply showing the end result of such things will resolve the matter. Speaking from experience, health teachers often show videos of stories of underage drinking with the result often either being some kind of serious accident or death. However, even with these explicit warnings, people have continued to drink before the appropriate age on countless occasions.

There are many ways to go about new means of solutions. One idea few have delved into is lowering the age for drinking. Several countries, mainly throughout Europe, have a drinking age below the age of 21. This leads many to wonder if introducing such an item at a younger age will encourage teens to be more patient or perhaps allow them to experience it for themselves and determine the risk for themselves. However, this does have its own share have negatives. With this plan implemented, the risk for your diagnosis of alcoholism/ being alcoholic greatly increases.

Another possible solution to this dilemma is simply to keep the age for drinking the same but rather introduce alcohol in a controlled fashion or somehow give the curious few the sensation of being inebriated. Although this sounds like a rather odd proposition, only positive results can occur. It doesn’t take a scientist to know that people will not do what they do not like, simple as that. So rather than waiting for teenagers to get into trouble or an accident with underage drinking, why not simply induce the sensation? Although as it stands, such a measure would be illegal. However, if such things were to be researched and conducted in a controlled environment, it should yield positive results. Theory behind this is, those who would succumb to the substance anyway would surface sooner and could have the matter addressed; furthermore, those who choose not to be a part of underage drinking will not be affected along with those who decide to stay away from alcohol after the controlled test. Simply put, people will be protected because of the parameters set by such testing.

Although most of this proposal is theoretical and based solely on speculation, there have been past precedents to establish such things. One such example would be the lowering of the voting age. It was thought to be a necessity to maintain a level political playing field and to also introduce politics to an audience of a younger age.

There are many ways to dissuade teens from being involved with underage drinking; however, the current methods being implemented haven’t been quite to the level of efficiency they should be at. Thus, it has become a priority to develop a new way for people to stay away from underage drinking.   

There’s no easy way to phrase this without provoking a barrage of “What are you, crazy?” emails, but here’s my theory: By the time she hits 20, even the shyest, mousiest, most un-Katie-Holmes like woman has developed at least a rudimentary strategy for fending off (or responding to) unsolicited come-ons by eager guys. But unless a guy happens to look like Viggo Mortensen, he can persist well into his 40s without once having been — flatly, out of the blue — asked out on a date. (After that, the odds tend to shift, as those handsome, hard-driving captain-of-industry types die off or get married, resulting in a surplus of on-the-prowl single women. Have I offended anyone yet?)

Anyway, whatever the explanation, the fact is that single women are more accustomed to being asked out, and single guys are more accustomed to doing the asking — which means there’s not a lot of data out there about how men like to be approached for a first date. With an eye toward correcting this imbalance, here are my observations about the best way to hit on a guy, whether it’s someone you work with, someone you’ve met online, or someone you’ve just rear-ended at a busy intersection.

 

Be direct.

Guys are complete idiots (being a guy myself, I mean this in the nicest possible way). In your own mind, you may think you’re being absolutely, unmistakably clear about your intentions when you ask that adorable hipster in the next cubicle if he’d like to grab some Thai takeout for lunch, whereas he’s probably thinking something like “Thai… cool. I am kinda hungry.” Ask a guy out the way he’d ask you out: “Would you like to have dinner tonight?” is fairly hard to misinterpret, and “Would you like to come over to my place tonight and I’ll cook you dinner?” is even harder to misinterpret (though don’t put it past him to think something like, “Gee, that’s nice of her. She must have some salmon that’s about to spoil.”)

Be indirect. 

Well, OK, here’s another approach to try: Remember how, back in junior high school, you’d ask your girlfriend to ask her sister if that cute, broody guy on your bus was going steady with anyone? This technique works well in adult life, too: The fact is, most guys were deeply unpopular in junior high school and will be flattered to have your friends do some advance scouting (just make sure your emissary isn’t on the market herself, lest you wind up recreating the plot of a Miley Cyrus movie). Really, there are worse things than having a friend go fishing on your behalf with a, “Hey, are you seeing anyone now…? I know someone who thinks you’re cute…” Note to guys: Based on my experience, this approach doesn’t work with grown-up women, who’d rather you show some guts and do your own legwork.

Come up with a plan. 

Choose between the following two conversations. Conversation A: You, to that cute guy in the coffee shop: “Um, do you think you’d… maybe like to… go out sometime?” Cute guy in the coffee shop, to you: “Um… yeah… maybe we can do something… sometime.” Conversation B: You, to that cute sales clerk at Barnes & Noble: “Hey, Dave Eggers is giving a reading tonight at a really cool bar downtown. Would you like to go?” Cute sales clerk at Barnes & Noble, to you: “Sure!” Get the point?

Don’t come on too strong.

I’ll spare you the Freudian mumbo-jumbo about how, deep down, guys are actually scared of women, and their subconscious minds will transform an ostensibly breezy come-on (“Hey, Slim! What say I treat you to some steak and eggs at Denny’s?”) into a screaming nightmare about some woman in a caftan chasing them with a pair of oversized scissors. It’s unfair, I agree, but the way society is set up, men are much better able to get away with confident-bordering-on-arrogant bluster than women are. Be nice; use a gentle voice; smile. Approach the object of your desire as you would a timid bunny rabbit.

Don’t over-plan.

It’s only in sitcoms that guys hire skywriters and three-piece mariachi bands to announce their interest in cute, yet clueless, roommates. So don’t feel you should follow that tradition. Blue Angel flybys may be out of your price range, but even a gimmick as innocent-seeming as a homemade chocolate muffin accompanied by a written invitation is overdoing it… and may set off a man’s Obsessed radar. And you don’t have to invite the guy out for much more than some liquid refreshment. Just ask, plain and simple, the same way you’d ask for directions to the ladies’ room. “Would you like to have a cup of coffee/grab lunch sometime?” will work just fine. Frankly, most of us are so flattered that you’d request our company that we’re delighted to oblige.

Bob Strauss is a freelance writer and children’s book author who lives in New York City. He’s also written the Dinosaur guide on About.com, the online information network owned by the New York Times.

Standards Change with the Times: A literary narrative

                                                                  Standards Change with the Times

                Communication is one of the many vital facets that makes up contemporary society and human relations today. Often, our comprehension of literacy and the journey we take to reach our understanding of the written language is a reflection of many things: our ability to learn, the desire to improve, and the expansion of readily available knowledge. People’s experiences with reading in various mediums often shape them as people; this change is evident from the various first experience with any written or legible material. However, often, people’s first experiences with such material differ as technology continues to grow and expand. People now read and write things in almost completely unique fashions based on where they are and what medium of literacy they are utilizing.

            With published, handwritten, or heavily advertised work, I employ a certain set of standards and criteria in order to ensure the work is of a certain quality; this process is seemingly nonexistent for objects written on either social media or found on sites that are perhaps unknown to many. In that instance, I just assume that the information is in all likelihood either incorrect or mistaken in some fashion. However, for published works, I tend to read carefully and absorb all the information, this also applies to reading online works. In contrast, the online works I assume are wrong until proven otherwise. Written and public works have undergone extensive editing and criticism from publishing and should be able to evoke some kind of emotion, positive or negative. This rule applies to things from full-fledged novels to simple articles and reviews. Blog posts, comments on various sites, Tumblr posts, and essentially all social media utilize very few tools to ensure quality writing; the only guaranteed equipment people have for on par level writing is auto-correct and grammar correcting options on the computer, even then that doesn’t insure any form of decent writing. On the other hand, published and other forms of written works not only have the staple tools of computer run correction, but they also have a set of people who specialize in the editing of papers, as well as improvement.

            This means of critiquing has come about in a manner most would refer to as “trial by fire.” In order to further extrapolate this metaphor, I will explain as to how my own manner of criticism came in to exist. My first introduction to the computer was in in middle school where I would utilize word documents and the internet for various projects; however, it wasn’t until high school when I first began to make use of social media that I began to employ this hypercritical reading. My sophomore English teacher introduced us to a website where we go to read various news articles and we would have to post a brief synopsis as well as our own various opinions on the issue. As the school year went on, I would read various posts beside my own as I had become curious as to why I took so long to come up with a coherent post while others seemed to take mere minutes. I was soon shocked to find out that these posts were little blurbs and random bits literally cut and paste from the article with a few opinions thrown in. Soon after I got sucked into the realm known to many simply as “Facebook” where essentially the same phenomenon occurred: people regurgitating news bits with their own opinions intertwined. Although, on occasion, there were posts that struck me by surprise by having some informative purpose or that demanded a higher level of understanding, most posts were simply things such as “Like if you’re tall” and “The leading cause of divorce is marriage.” Ever since reading such nonsensical writings, I decided that social media is no place to find worthwhile writing. Thus, the more forms of media and social media I was introduced to on the internet, my standards began to change along with them.

            My criticism of works also depends on how easily someone has access to the materials. For example, I take published works very seriously to the extent that, having your work published in and of itself makes it noteworthy. Furthermore, if the written material is something in the form of social media or a simple note, I have no reason to expect Dickens’ quality writing. Nearly every human being as access to the internet and social media; thus, the expectations for any kind of literary posting cannot be set too high for the simple fact that it doesn’t exclude anyone from writing or have any kind of set expectation for writing.

            Although one would assume that writing would improve given new technology and a larger medium for people to share their writing, it would appear works on the have seen a decline in quality. Even with means to correct things like grammar mistakes and spelling errors, people seem to find ways to not only misspell, but many continue to create new slang and terminology for things that already exist. For example, terms such as “swag” or “selfie” weren’t even actual words or had very different denotations until the past decade. The simple fact that people can’t find adequate words within their own vocabulary for things such as this only further shows why many online works cannot be taken seriously. Although many authors do publish their blogs or websites online, the simple fact is that any form of decent writing is limited to “media” as opposed to “social media.” News itself, even it be entertainment oriented news, is still responsible for providing quality level information as well as the need to employ a general understanding of the English language.

            I say understanding of the English language for many reasons. As it stands, very few others countries are as in tune with their social media as the United States. Although every culture and written language has its own unique slang and colloquial terminology, no one utilizes such tool as much as the United States. When it comes to foreign works, even if they are translations, I almost always presume they are composed at a level higher than what is to be expected. This includes social media. Although one could argue that the quality of writing in the English language has been undermined by its sheer complexity, the simple fact is most people are simply unable to write on that level.

            Literature has come to the point where not only must people read certain works differently but also have different expectations and criticisms for different works. Critiques were at one point seemingly universal for any kind of written work with very few exceptions. The standards have been lowered.  

            

Literary Narrative (Rough Draft 2/Revised Draft)

Communication is one of the many vital facets that makes up contemporary society and human relations today. Often, our comprehension of literacy and the journey we take to reach our understanding of the written language is a reflection of many things: our ability to learn, the desire to improve, and the expansion of readily available knowledge. People’s experiences with reading in various mediums often shape them as people; this change is evident from the various first experience with any written or legible material. However, often, people’s first experiences with such material differ as technology continues to grow and expand. People now read and write things in almost completely unique fashions based on where they are and what medium of literacy they are utilizing.

With published, handwritten, or heavily advertised work, I employ a certain set of standards and criteria in order to ensure the work is of a certain quality; this process is seemingly nonexistent for objects written on either social media or found on sites that are perhaps unknown to many. In that instance, I just assume that the information is in all likelihood either incorrect or mistaken in some fashion. However, for published works, I tend to read carefully and absorb all the information, this also applies to reading online works. In contrast, the online works I assume are wrong until proven otherwise. Written and public works have undergone extensive editing and criticism from publishing and should be able to evoke some kind of emotion, positive or negative. This rule applies to things from full-fledged novels to simple articles and reviews. Blog posts, comments on various sites, Tumblr posts, and essentially all social media utilize very few tools to ensure quality writing; the only guaranteed equipment people have for on par level writing is auto-correct and grammar correcting options on the computer, even then that doesn’t insure any form of decent writing. On the other hand, published and other forms of written works not only have the staple tools of computer run correction, but they also have a set of people who specialize in the editing of papers, as well as improvement.

This means of critiquing has come about in a manner most would refer to as “trial by fire.” In order to further extrapolate this metaphor, I will explain as to how my own manner of criticism came in to exist. My first introduction to the computer was in in middle school where I would utilize word documents and the internet for various projects; however, it wasn’t until high school when I first began to make use of social media that I began to employ this hypercritical reading. My sophomore English teacher introduced us to a website where we go to read various news articles and we would have to post a brief synopsis as well as our own various opinions on the issue. As the school year went on, I would read various posts beside my own as I had become curious as to why I took so long to come up with a coherent post while others seemed to take mere minutes. I was soon shocked to find out that these posts were little blurbs and random bits literally cut and paste from the article with a few opinions thrown in. Soon after I got sucked into the realm known to many simply as “Facebook” where essentially the same phenomenon occurred: people regurgitating news bits with their own opinions intertwined. Although on occasion there were posts that struck me by surprise by having some informative purpose or demanding a higher level of understanding, most posts were simply things such as “Like if you’re tall” and “The leading cause of divorce is marriage.” Ever since reading such nonsensical writings, I decided that social media is no place to find worthwhile writing. Thus, the more forms of media and social media I was introduced to on the internet, my standards began to change along with them.

My criticism of works also depends on how easily someone has access to the materials. For example, I take published works very seriously to the extent that, having your work published in and of itself makes it noteworthy. Furthermore, if the written material is something in the form of social media or a simple note, I have no reason to expect Dickens’ quality writing. Nearly every human being as access to the internet and social media; thus, the expectations for any kind of literary posting cannot be set too high for the simple fact that it doesn’t exclude anyone from writing or have any kind of set expectation for writing.

Although one would assume that writing would improve given new technology and a larger medium for people to share their writing, it would appear works on the have seen a decline in quality. Even with means to correct things like grammar mistakes and spelling errors, people seem to find ways to not only misspell, but many continue to create new slang and terminology for things that already exist. For example, terms such as “swag” or “selfie” weren’t even actual words or had very different denotations until the past decade. The simple fact that people can’t find adequate words within their own vocabulary for things such as this only further shows why many online works cannot be taken seriously. Although many authors do publish their blogs or websites online, the simple fact is that any form of decent writing is limited to “media” as opposed to “social media.” News itself, even it be entertainment oriented news, is still responsible for providing quality level information as well as the need to employ a general understanding of the English language.

I say understanding of the English language for many reasons. As it stands, very few others countries are as in tune with their social media as the United States. Although every culture and written language has its own unique slang and colloquial terminology, no one utilizes such tool as much as the United States. When it comes to foreign works, even if they are translations, I almost always presume they are composed at a level higher than what is to be expected. This includes social media. Although one could argue that the quality of writing in the English language has been undermined by its sheer complexity, the simple fact is most people are simply unable to write on that level.

Literature has come to the point where not only must people read certain works differently but also have different expectations and criticisms for different works. Critiques were at one point seemingly universal for any kind of written work with very few exceptions.

Literary Narrative (Rough Draft 1) :” Standards Change with the Times.”

          Communication is one of the many vital facets that makes up contemporary society and human relations today. Often, our comprehension of literacy and the journey we take to reach our understanding of the written language is a reflection of many things: our ability to learn, the desire to improve, and the expansion of readily available knowledge. People’s experiences with reading in various mediums often shape them as people; this change is evident from the various first experience with any written or legible material. However, often, people’s first experiences with such material differ as technology continues to grow and expand. People now read and write things in almost completely unique fashions based on where they are and what medium of literacy they are utilizing.

            With published, handwritten, or heavily advertised work, I employ a certain set of standards and criteria in order to ensure the work is of a certain quality; this process is seemingly nonexistent for objects written on either social media or found on sites seemingly unknown. In that instance, I just assume that the information is in all likelihood either incorrect or mistaken in some fashion. However, for published works, I tend to read carefully and absorb all the information, this also applies to reading online works. In contrast, the online works I assume are wrong until proven otherwise. Written and public works have undergone extensive editing and criticism from publishing and should be able to evoke some kind of emotion, positive or negative. This rule applies to things from full-fledged novels to simple articles and reviews. Blog posts, comments on various sites, Tumblr posts, and essentially all social media utilize very few tools to ensure quality writing; the only guaranteed equipment people have for on par level writing is auto-correct and grammar correcting options on the computer, even then that doesn’t insure any form of decent writing. On the other hand, published and other forms of written works not only have the staple tools of computer run correction, but they also have a set of people who specialize in the editing of papers, as well as improvement.

            My criticism of works also depends on how easily someone has access to the materials. For example, I take published works very seriously to the extent that, having your work published in and of itself makes it noteworthy. Furthermore, if the written material is something in the form of social media or a simple note, I have no reason to expect Dickens’ quality writing. Nearly every human being as access to the internet and social media; thus, the expectations for any kind of literary posting cannot be set too high for the simple fact that it doesn’t exclude anyone from writing or have any kind of set expectation for writing.

            Although one would assume that writing would improve given new technology and a larger medium for people to share their writing, it would appear works on the have seen a decline in quality. Even with means to correct things like grammar mistakes and spelling errors, people seem to find ways to not only misspell, but many continue to create new slang and terminology for things that already exist. For example, terms such as “swag” or “selfie” weren’t even actual words or had very different denotations until the past decade. The simple fact that people can’t find adequate words within their own vocabulary for things such as this only further shows why many online works cannot be taken seriously. Although many authors do publish their blogs or websites online, the simple fact is that any form of decent writing is limited to “media” as opposed to “social media.” News itself, even it be entertainment oriented news, is still responsible for providing quality level information as well as the need to employ a general understanding of the English language.

            I say understanding of the English language for many reasons. As it stands, very few others countries are as in tune with their social media as the United States. Although every culture and written language has its own unique slang and colloquial terminology, no one utilizes such tool as much as the United States. When it comes to foreign works, even if they are translations, I almost always presume they are composed at a level higher than what is to be expected. This includes social media. Although one could argue that the quality of writing in the English language has been undermined by its sheer complexity, the simple fact is most people are simply unable to write on that level.

            Literature has come to the point where not only must people read certain works differently but also have different expectations and criticisms for different works. Critiques were at one point seemingly universal for any kind of written work with very few exceptions.